Three new species discovered in Bhutan for the first time | WWF

Three new species discovered in Bhutan for the first time



Posted on 29 January 2011
A new species of mammal, Ferret badger
© WWF Bhutan/ Tenzin Wangchuk
A new species of mammal, Ferret badger was discovered in Royal Manas National Park for the first time in February 2010. Ferret Badger is small dark grey carnivore with pale or white lips, chin, throat, belly, and inner legs. It has a dorsal white streak from head to shoulders and has long, white tipped, brownish-grey tail and padded feet with striations suitably adapted for tree life.

In another occasion, a group of bird experts from United Kingdom during their bird watching trip sighted a blue-tailed bee-eater (Merops philippinus) in Thrumshingla National park. The bird was sighted on April 11, 2010 and experts have confirmed it as the first ever sighting in the nation. Though the bird is not a rare species but its sightings at 3,150 m above sea level was fascinating as the bird belongs to that of tropical habitat. Like other bee-eaters, it predominantly feeds on insects, especially bees, wasps and hornets.

On 19th April, 2010 yet another bird, a juvenile red-necked Phalarope was spotted on the banks of the Phochu River in Punakha (central Bhutan). The red-necked Phalarope breeds in the low Arctic and sub Arctic zones and winters in Indonesia and other ocean countries. So, therefore, their sighting in Bhutan was not unusual. However, this sighting was also the first ever recorded in the country for the specie.

These new finds goes on to prove that with proper research and scientific knowledge, Bhutan’s forest may unveil yet many new wildlife formerly unknown to exist in the nation.
A new species of mammal, Ferret badger
© WWF Bhutan/ Tenzin Wangchuk Enlarge